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Interdisciplinary Fridays 2016-2017

The Interdisciplinary Friday seminars provide an overview on a wide scope of interdisciplinary research in life sciences and education. They promote discussions and scientific exchange among the fellows and senior scientists and develop an interdisciplinary scientific community.

Each session consists of 3 short talks (~10 minutes) by first year FdV students introducing their research question and experimental/theoretical strategy followed by a discussion. Drinks and snacks will be provided.

The IF seminars take place in the Seminar Room 21.09  at CRI Montparnasse Location (33, avenue du Maine 75015 Paris), from 17:30-19:00.

Identifying minimal functional units in the folate metabolism

Despite detailed knowledge of the genetic sequence and biochemical function of many individual genes, it remains challenging to understand which genes are essential for an organism. The scientific community lacks a general understanding of minimal functional units of organismal design, that could provide a simplified and structured view of biological organisms.  Current evolutionary studies on

PhD Student : Judith Boldt
17:30
05/05
Selecting Beyond Fitness

In nature, evolution is provided by the survival and reproduction of cells, organisms or populations that are best suited to their environment. Through numerous iterative cycles of mutation and selection, natural evolution has created thousands of proteins with different functions. Our knowledge about the process for the emergence of proteins with a new function remains

PhD Student : Guillaume Villain
17:30
05/05
Morphogenesis of Gorgonians

TBA

PhD Student : Paul Valcke
17:30
05/05
The COCOON project

During sexual selection, animals rely on communication signals to choose their mates. This choice can rely on signals produced during a short period of time, called events. In some cases, events, like mate calls in some tree frogs, can be a driver a speciation by creating a pre-copulatory barriers. However, even if mate calls are

PhD Student : Alexis Dollion
17:30
05/19
Deciphering the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the radiosensitizing activity of metal complexes: towards the development of drug candidates for improving chemoradiotherapy for cancer treatment

The induction of double-strand breaks and inhibition of DNA repair are known to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing radiation, however the specific mechanisms of radiosensitization remain largely unknown. For example it has been shown to increase telomere dysfunction radiosensitivity but the underlying reasons are not included. We have recently identified a series of metal complexes

PhD Student : Deepanjan Ghosh
17:30
05/19
What makes us allergic? – Defining common features of an “allergic” immune phenotype

Immune homeostasis requires adapted responses aimed at defending the host, thus protecting it from infection and promoting repair from injury. However, this process can go wrong, resulting in chronic inflammation or exuberated immune reactions, such as allergies. Over the last century allergies have developed from a rare disease to a major health concern that affects

PhD Student : Yu Wang
17:30
05/19
Controlling intracellular signals with magnetic nanoparticles

Polarization of cells is made through the generation of asymmetrical activation of signals inside the cytoplasm of the cell in response to extracellular cues. During migration this process allow to control the migratory direction using mainly three different RhoGTPases (CDC42, Rac1, RhoA). I am studying how from the cues (the input) the cell process the

PhD Student : Elie Balloul
17:30
05/19